Law and Humanities

Dystopic prisons in panoptic fiction

Over the centuries, Bentham’s Panopticon scheme has triggered a wide range of political, philosophical and literary responses. The present research wishes to shed new light on panoptic references in “Vigilance” (Patrick McGrath, 1989), Green River Rising (Tim Willocks, 1994) and The Panopticon (Jenni Fagan, 2013) from a prison management perspective, focusing on the representations of prison staff and management, rather than on inmates.

Professor

Professor Yablon graduated magna cum laude from Columbia University. He was a clerk to Chief Judge Irving R. Kaufman, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Professor Yablon was an associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore and then at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.

Mr

Julen Etxabe is docent in legal theory from the University of Helsinki and writes in the areas of legal and political theory, law and humanities, and human rights. As a Fulbright scholar, he completed his SJD at the University of Michigan Law School with James Boyd White. He has taught at the University of Michigan (2008-10) and at the Faculty of Law of the University of Helsinki since 2010. He was a research fellow at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies (2014-17) and co-editor in chief of No-Foundations: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Law and Justice from 2012-17.

Visitor Profile - Professor Linda Mulcahy

Professor Des Manderson inducted into Australian Academy of Law

500 years on, it is time to set sail for Utopia

Utopia 500

An exciting collaboration between the ABC, the ANU Centre for Law, Arts and the Humanities, and the National Library of Australia - featuring Alexis Wright, Miles Franklin award-winning author of Carpentaria and The Swan Book; Peter Singer, the most wide-ranging and influential philosopher in the world today; Russell Jacoby, author of The End of Utopia and Utopian Thought for an Anti-Utopian Age; and Jacqueline Dutton, an expert on the history of Australian utopias.

Lawyers challenged to speak through pictures instead of words

Can swearing-in ceremonies offer clues to judges' future rulings

Challenging Words

An inspiring and original event

 

I enjoyed this SO MUCH! In fact it reinspired me and reminded me why I am so interested in interdisciplinary study of law and the humanities.

 

It was beneficial, fun, thought-provoking, breaks down boundaries, opens up new connections, enriches our understanding of law.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Law and Humanities

Updated:  24 August 2017/Responsible Officer:  College General Manager, ANU College of Law/Page Contact:  Law Marketing Team